Britton Nasser

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Week 1

[[1]]


Week 2

[2] This is a little pattern animation I did. I think it's pretty nifty looking. It reminds me of some sort of wacked out sunset.


I learned how to integrate text using processing using a tutorial online, I modified the code and I was able to get the text to "rain" or scramble when you click on it. click it and the letters get jiggy wit it na na nananana

Check it out here: [3]

Week 3

I've been trying to work with booleans, as per the example of the redEye bird, but the sketch is broken. Everything draws out but maybe I didn't call the boolean correctly?

Here it is: [4]

Analog:

How to Make a Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich

1. Take a loaf of bread.

2. Observe number of pieces.

3. Decide whether or not to interact with the loaf of bread.

3. Contemplate whether or not to choose to take two slices of bread.

3a. If yes, choose which slices you want.

3b. If not, then go on to the next step.

4. If you want peanut butter, put on a slice of bread.

5. Ask yourself what feels right, the peanut butter or jelly?

6. If you haven’t but the jelly on a slice of bread, do so.

7. If you have, put peanut butter on the other slice of bread.

8. Put the jelly on the other slice of bread, if it does not contain peanut butter.

9. Decide what order you want to put the slices together.

10. If you feel comfortable with the order in which you placed the slices, think about the sandwich.

11. If you choose to consume the sandwich, then do so.

12. Otherwise, think about the sandwich.


oct 13

http://student2.bennington.edu/~bnasser/timesketchfinal/

the sketch is broken, it works differently on my computer for some reason.

Final Project Proposal

I want to make a piece that aggregates data from Patientslikeme.com, and displays it visually. The website is a community of terminally ill patients--from the mood disordered to HIV/AIDS patients--that collaboratively share treatments and symptoms. Quality of life and treatments are rated by various users, and for such disorders as schizophrenia, mood maps help other users discover what treatments are working for others and which treatments are not working. I am interested in medicine and disease, and the concept of patientslikeme as one that is community-based and socially-minded is intriguing to me. I predict that keywords will be my best friend in terms of collecting data. Upon looking up a schizophrenic patient, I was presented with a mood map of her progress and blog updates, as well as her own personal treatments and symptoms. Apart from examining individuals, I also have access to various treatments and symptoms by disease category.


In terms of schizophrenia, the symptoms are listed as follows:

• auditory hallucinations

• visual hallucinations

• delusions

• disorganized thinking


The various overlying treatments are listed as follows:

• prescription drugs

• supplements

• OTC drugs

• physical therapy

• equipment

• procedures

• exercise

• nutrition

• psychotherapy

• lifestyle modifications

• other: pets, journals, meditation, cigarettes, listening to music


I was inspired by the following article: [5] which details a computer program which, upon inputting symptom data, would return a diagnoses. However, I want to create the reverse aspect. I want to start with the disease, and evaluate symptoms and treatments according to mood maps (and, furthermore, the patients’ quality of life.) I suppose I will be using the above keywords--have all the treatments and symptoms listed in a data file and create an interface that displays the disease along with symptoms and treatments, according to effectiveness and subsequent mood. Gathering such data will be my first task, and creating the actual interface will be my second. This week and over Thanksgiving I will aggregate data and construct the visual components/template, and then start coding the actual display.

Update

Twitter mood map based on 300 tweets: http://img.metro.co.uk/i/pix/2010/07/30/article-1280495121981-0A9BC339000005DC-56339_636x313.jpg

Inspired to recreate a sort of Bennington mood map by collecting survey data based on a Happiness scale, correlating energy scale, and time of mood.