Brendon and Glennis

From BenningtonWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Wiki Home

Brainstorming

We started with marbles and movement and thought about various ways to introduce an Arduino into the classic marble maze. We talked about the NYU box project and thought about ways how to make a maze 3D. Talked about possibility of the interaction between the marbles and the mazes and how they could work together. We also thought about how humans and the maze interact. Maybe there is sound? Light? something else? Buttons that determine the path of the marble, some way to control the maze. We moved on to talk about how perhaps instead of using a box, we could make the maze 2D again, using gravity to push the ball down through the maze rather than turning the box to control the movement. This way, it opens up more ways that we could use the Arduino to control its movement.

We've decided to keep to the simple gravity-powered maze idea. We would have two boards that are put upright in a base board. Wood/muslin/nails/any other material will guide the marbles down to a bottom ramp which guides the marbles into a small cup in the base board. When a pressure sensor at the bottom of the cup recognizes that two marbles are in it, the LEDs blink and victory sounds are made. As the marbles go down the maze, pressure sensors on the ramps either make the LEDs turn on and sounds are made. (see drawing above)

Finished Project

After out chat with the class we discussed using metal marbles so that the marble could be used to complete circuits along the path of maze. We started by borrowing two metal balls from John Umphlett. We then made our boards out of foam core and glued scrap wood ramps onto the boards. We then wired the ramps so that each side had one wire (one side power, one side ground). When the metal ball passes through the wiring on each ramp, the circuit is completed and each LED on the board lights up for the moment that the ball is touching the two wires.

Once the ball reaches the end of its path, it lands in a small wooden box wired so that two balls have to be present to complete the circuit. When it is, the result is a loud buzzing sound from a 'sound bomb' that goes off for the entire time the balls are touching.

Brendon's Board is running the code below:

const int LED = 2;  
const int SOUND = 3;

void setup() {
  pinMode(LED, OUTPUT);  
  pinMode(SOUND, OUTPUT);  
}

void loop (){
  digitalWrite(LED, HIGH); 
  digitalWrite(SOUND, HIGH);
}

Glennis's Board is running the code below:

const int LED = 2;  

void setup() {
  pinMode(LED, OUTPUT);  
  
}

void loop (){
  digitalWrite(LED, HIGH); 

}

We think that this project achieves playful simplicity. The code is very straight forward and simple, and it is the hardware where the complexity arises.